Lisa Carter-Harris, PhD, APRN, ANP-C

Lisa Carter-Harris, PhD, APRN, ANP-C

Science of Nursing Care
Assistant Professor
Associate Member, Cancer Prevention and Control, IU Simon Cancer Center
Affiliate Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute (Seattle, WA)

Contact Information

Email: lcharris@iu.edu
Website: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=carter-harris+l
Phone: 317-274-2043
Nursing W427, Indianapolis

Education

Postdoctoral Fellowship, Indiana University
PhD, University of Louisville
MSN, University of Louisville
BSN, Spalding University

Biography

Dr. Carter-Harris' program of research is aimed at improving patient-provider communication and the shared decision-making process in cancer screening decisions. Her research interests lie in understanding the myriad of factors that influence the decision to screen, or not, for lung cancer including the impact of stigma and important health beliefs and their impact on cancer prevention and control outcomes. Her overarching goal is to develop and translate science in this emerging field of lung cancer screening to improve the decision-making process and decisional outcomes in patients at risk for the deadliest cancer in the world. To date, she has developed a conceptual model on lung cancer screening participation to guide research in this area as well as developed and psychometrically validated the Lung Cancer Screening Health Beliefs Scales (comprised of four scales to measure perceived risk of lung cancer, perceived benefits of lung cancer screening, perceived barriers to lung cancer screening, and self-efficacy for lung cancer screening). She has examined knowledge and beliefs about lung cancer and screening in long-term smokers as well as explored the decision to opt out of lung cancer screening in patients who were recently offered screening by their primary care provider and declined. She is currently developing a theory-based computer-tailored decision support intervention called LungTalk©  to help prepare high-risk patients to engage in a discussion about lung health and screening with their healthcare provider, make a decision about lung cancer screening, and intervene with current smokers who are ready to make a quit attempt. Her work has resulted in first-authored peer-reviewed papers published in leading oncology, nursing, and interdisciplinary journals, including Oncology Nursing Forum, Health Expectations, Cancer Nursing, Patient Education & Counseling, Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, Applied Nursing Research, and Journal of Cancer Education. In addition to research, Dr. Carter-Harris is a board-certified adult nurse practitioner and enjoys mentoring students. She is actively involved in several professional organizations such as the Society of Behavioral Medicine and the Midwest Nursing Research Society. She is the current chair of the Decision Making Research Interest Group (RIG) and past co-chair of the Health Promoting Behaviors Across the Lifespan RIG of the Midwest Nursing Research Society. Dr. Carter-Harris serves as a scientific reviewer for the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI).

Website: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Lisa_Carter-Harris

External Funding

National Cancer Institute (1R15CA208543-01A1) (2017-2020) Lung Cancer Screening: Identifying Factors Associated with Participation. Principal Investigator.

National Cancer Institute Cancer Research Network Scholar Program (U24 CA171524) (2015-2017) Prevalence of Lung Cancer Screening in High-Risk Smokers. CRN Scholar.

Cancer Research Network Opportunity Fund (2015–2016) Exploring Opting Out of Lung Cancer Screening Participation in Long-term Smokers. Principal Investigator.

Sigma Theta Tau International Iota Zeta Chapter Research Grant (2015–2016) Measuring Health Beliefs about Lung Cancer Screening: Pilot Testing Recruitment Feasibility via Social Media versus Traditional Methods. Principal Investigator.

Oncology Nursing Society Foundation/Genentech Inc. Research Career Development Award (2015–2016) Lung Cancer Screening: Model Testing and Shared Decision-Making. Mentee/Project Director.

Selected Publications

Carter-Harris, L., Schwindt, R., Bakoyannis, G., Ceppa, D. P., Rawl, S. M. (2017). Current smokers’ preferences for receiving cessation information in a lung cancer screening setting. Journal of Cancer Education, 1-6. [Epub ahead of print]. doi:10.1007/s13187-017-1222-7

Carter-Harris, L., Brandzel, S., Wernli, K. J., Roth, J. A., & Buist, D. S. M. (2017). A qualitative study exploring why individuals opt out of lung cancer screening. Family Practice, 1-6. [Epub ahead of print Jan 24, 2017]. doi:10.1093/fampra/cmw146

Carter-Harris, L., Davis, L. L., & Rawl, S. M. (2016). Lung cancer screening participation: Developing a conceptual model to guide research. Research and Theory for Nursing Practice: An International Journal, 30(4), 1-21.

Carter-Harris, L., Tan, A. S., Salloum, R., & Young-Wolff, K. C. (2016). Patient-provider conversations about lung cancer screening pre- and post-guidelines: Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). Patient Education & Counseling, pil: S0738-3991(16)30212-9. doi:10.1016/j.pec.2016.05014 [Epub ahead of print 05.17.2016]. PMID:27241830

Carter-Harris, L., Bartlett Ellis, R., Warrick, A., & Rawl, S. M. (2016). Beyond traditional newspaper recruitment: Leveraging Facebook targeted advertisement to recruit long-term smokers for research. Journal of Medical Internet Research18(6): e117. doi:10.2196/jmir.5502. PMID: 27306780

Carter-Harris, L., Slaven, J., Monahan, P. O., & Rawl, S. M. (2016). Development and psychometric evaluation of the lung cancer screening health belief scales. Cancer Nursing: An International Journal for Cancer Care, 1-8 [ePub ahead of print 05.17.2016]. doi:10.1097/NCC.0000000000000386

Carter-Harris, L., Ceppa, D. P., Hanna, N., & Rawl, S. M. (2015). Lung cancer screening: What do long-term smokers know and believe? Health Expectations, 1-10  [ePub ahead of print 12.23.2015]. doi:10.1111/hex.12433

Carter-Harris, L. (2015). Lung cancer stigma as a barrier to medical help-seeking behavior: Practice implications. Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 27(5), 240-245. PubMed PMCID: PMC4414901; doi:10.1002/2327-6924.12227

For a full list, please visit: Pubmed